Course Listings


EDU 1210. The Residence Life Experience (II; 3- On Demand) This introduction to the role of the Resident Assistant, includes Student Affairs theory, Higher Education Best Practices, Leadership theory, and Critical and Creative thinking. Emphasis on developing community among residence life staff members.  Classroom instruction will be supplemented by other training programs such as fall pre-service training, staff  meetings, and in-service training.  The objective is to provide students with the knowledge and skills to be effective RAs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

EDU 2200. Introduction to the Teaching of Reading (I, II; 3) An introductory overview course reviewing current research, approaches, and methodology of teaching reading and literacy processes and skills in today’s schools. The course is intended to introduce candidates to: (a) an understanding of the reading process; (b) a knowledge of research-based reading and literacy strategies; (c) competencies and attitudes for teachers of literacy; and (d) acquaintance with materials used in teaching, reading, writing, and spelling. Prerequisite: None.

EDU 2262. Educational Foundations (I, II; 3) This course is designed for the pre-professional development of historical, philosophical and sociological perspectives for successful teaching and learning in urban schools. Students will have the opportunity to experience diverse school, community and college laboratory settings to help them determine whether teacher education is the appropriate field and to explore the various options in classroom teaching. Prerequisite: None. Equivalent to TAG OED001.

EDU 2263. Classroom Management and Student Discipline (I, II; 3) This course is designed to teach the various strategies and techniques for managing a classroom. The major emphasis is placed on a preventive problem approach. Consideration is given to identifying inappropriate classroom behavior, and on selecting and applying appropriate techniques for modifying inappropriate behavior. In addition, attention is given to designing the learning environment to maximize teaching effectiveness. Prerequisite: None.

EDU 2264. Multicultural Education (I, II; 3) This course is designed to focus on interrelationships of social forces and education, including an introduction to multicultural and global issues in contemporary society, and their application to the educational process and schooling. A multicultural education paper required. Successful completion of this course is required for formal admission to the College of Education. Prerequisite: None.

EDU 2265. Educational Technology (I, II; 3) This course provides students with and introduction to basic technology competencies of operating systems such as Windows and Macintosh. File and Folder Management, Networking and Video; professional productivity applications using e-mail and attachments, Word Processing, the Internet and WWW, Linear presentation technologies (PowerPoint), electronic grade books and spreadsheets (Excel), compression utilities and PDF; teaching with technology using educational technology strategies (e.g. media selection, software evaluation), electronic research bibliography; and media production assignments using digital images, desktop publishing, multimedia and web-quest. Prerequisite: None. Equivalent to TAG OED002.

EDU 2266. Individuals with Special Needs: Inclusion and Collaboration (I, II; 3) This course provides an overview of the characteristics of children for whom modifications are necessary. Exceptional children include individuals with mental retardation, the intellectually gifted, children with auditory handicaps, the visually handicapped, and children with specific learning and behavioral disabilities. Successful completion of this course is required for formal admission to the College of Education. Prerequisite: None. Equivalent to TAG OED004.

EDU 2300. Educational Psychology (I, II; 3) This course addresses systems of learning theory and social development. Candidates are exposed to prominent theorists and research that shape current educational programs. Through this course prospective teachers should understand the interactions of the cognitive, behavioral, and intelligence theories that provide the basis for sound educational planning. Prerequisite: None. Equivalent to TAG OED003.

EDU 2360. Middle and AYA Teaching Methods (I, II; 3) In this first methods course, students will actively learn about the practice of teaching on the middle and secondary level.  Topics to be explored will include lesson and unit planning, multicultural curriculum, student-centered teaching strategies, project-based classroom instruction, group work and various methods of assessment.  Students will develop and implement unit plans to meet the Ohio Teacher Standards, Special Program Area Standards and NCATE Standards for middle to adolescence students of varying abilities and language backgrounds.  60 hours of fieldwork are required.  Prerequisites: Formal admittance to the College of Education and approval of advisor before registering for the course.  Candidates must secure an FBI and BCII Background check before teaching in Middle and high school classrooms.

EDU 2500. Professional Education Seminar (I, II, III; 2) This first seminar in Education is for students who have been formally accepted into the College of Education.  Topics related to the standards and assessments significant to teaching and becoming a teacher will be addressed.  Candidates will be introduced to Ohio and National Expectations for teaching and learning and the assessment process for teacher candidates and their assessment of student learning.  Candidates preparing to teach will be introduced to requirements, responsibilities, skills and dispositions involved in becoming a successful teacher candidate at Central State University. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing; completion of a minimum of 40 semester hours; successful completion of the General Education writing and math requirement; having passed the PPST; a GPA of 2.5; and approval of Department Chair.

EDU 3205. Adolescent and Young Adult Literature (I,  II; 3) Candidates will critically study and evaluate the genre and its connections to other forms of literature, examine the modes and themes in the literature, discuss and apply theories underlying the teacher of young adult literature, investigate strategies for encouraging student reading, and consider how young adult literature can be used to promote both life-long reading and critical thinking.  The candidates will meet these goals by using young adult literature commonly found in courses in nearby school districts.

EDU 3310. Language and Literacy/Microteaching (I, II; 3) This course focuses on the language development and literacy growth of young children, ages birth through eight years. Strategies for planning, teaching, and assessing a high quality, early childhood language arts program will be emphasized. The course includes an opportunity for students to engage in microteaching experiences requiring them to plan and practice-teach in diverse settings as a way to develop their teaching proficiencies. Prerequisites: EDU 2200, EDU 2262, EDU 2264,EDU 2266.

EDU 3315. Teaching Reading Through Children’s Literature/Microteaching (I, II; 3) This course looks at the current knowledge base of the reading process as it influences the use of children’s literature for reading instruction in early and middle childhood. Particular emphasis is placed on teaching to elicit personal response, reading for different purposes and appreciation of a range of culturally responsive literature. The course examines the reading curriculum for early and middle grades, particularly the Ohio Academic Content Standards for English Language Arts. It includes an opportunity for students to engage in microteaching experiences requiring them to plan and practice-teach in diverse settings as a way to develop their teaching proficiencies. Prerequisites: EDU 2200, EDU 2262, EDU 2264,EDU 2266.

EDU 3320. Phonics and Reading/Microteaching (I, II; 3) This course focuses on the research and knowledge concerning phonemic awareness, phonics, and fluency and their relationship to skill development in reading. It focuses on learning to identify words by using specific skills and on understanding the challenges of using the skills in learning to read. The course includes an opportunity for students to engage in microteaching experiences requiring them to plan and practice-teach in diverse settings as a way to develop their teaching proficiencies. Prerequisite: Must be formally admitted to the College of Education.

EDU 3325. Assessment and Measurement (I, II; 3) This course focuses on developing the skills necessary to become effective assessors of student learning, with emphasis on identifying instructional objectives and using the evaluation results to modifying the content, pace, format, and style of delivery. Covered in this course will be fundamentals of varied classroom assessments, such as pre-tests, formative and summative tests, authentic assessments and concepts of standardized testing.  Candidates will develop assessments and analyze how assessment data is used to improve instruction and learning.

EDU 3330. Teaching Reading in the Content Areas/ Microteaching (I; 3) An introduction to the range of strategies and programs for teaching the reading process in the content area, including the nature of the reading process, assessment techniques and instructional strategies to increase comprehension. The use of trade books and informational books in the microteaching experiences requiring candidates to plan and practice-teach in diverse settings as a way to develop their teaching proficiencies.  Specific course assignments and microteaching experiences are tailored to the student’s licensure areas.

EDU 3340. Special Education Law (I; 3) Special Education Law focuses on the study of court cases, state-level legislation, and related historical events that preceded passage of the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA) and No Child Left Behind (NCLB). This course covers definitions, procedural requirements, and legal safeguards of IDEA and NCLB, and is essential in the preparation of INS candidates to be successful on PRAXIS II. Emphasis will be placed on how the ODE is meeting and exceeding federal requirements. Prerequisites: EDU 2262, EDU 2264, and EDU 2266.

EDU 3341. Survey of Exceptional Students/Mild-Moderate (I; 3) This course provides background in the foundations and theories, etiology, diagnosis, and individual learning differences of individuals with mild to moderate disabilities. Prerequisites: EDU 2262, EDU 2264, EDU 2266.

EDU 3342. Instructional Strategies/Mild-Moderate (1; 3) Specialized teaching approaches, materials, curricula, and resources for individuals with mild to moderate disabilities.

EDU 3343. Collaborating with Parents/Professional Ethics and Responsibilities (I; 3) Provides practice in solving problems that are common to individuals with disabilities by using the parents as a valuable resource in enriching the school curriculum. Professional standards of the Council for Exceptional Children and professional responsibilities are addressed. Prerequisites: EDU 2262, EDU 2264,EDU 2266.

EDU 3361. Middle Child Language Arts Methods/Field Experience (I, II; 3) This course will provide teacher candidates of Middle child and Adolescent youth with various teaching and assessment strategies and models which provide language arts concepts and skills learning necessary for students to both understand and apply language arts concepts and skills in various contexts. The course will include a field dimension of at least 80 hours in which candidates will be assigned to work with a field teacher in an appropriate setting.  During this time, candidates will gain greater command of their abilities to plan, implement and evaluate student learning in language arts, manage the classroom and differentiate their instruction to meet individual student learning needs.  Evaluation of candidate performance will be a collaborative effort between the university instructor and the field teacher using established assessment instruments.  Candidates will be required to have state-required FBI and BCII Background checks before teaching in grades 4 through 9 and 7 through 12 classrooms.  Financial outlay to pay for the background checks.  Prerequisites: Approval of Program Advisor.

EDU 3362. Middle Child and Adolescent Mathematics Methods/Field Experience (I, II; 3) This course will provide teacher candidate of Middle Child and Adolescent youth with various teaching and assessment strategies and models which provide mathematics concepts and skill learning necessary for students to both students to both understand and apply mathematics concepts and skills in various contexts.  The course will include a field dimension of at least 80 hours in which candidates will be assigned to work with a field teacher in an appropriate setting.  During this time, candidates will gain greater command of their abilities to plan, implement and evaluate students in mathematics, manage the classroom and differentiate their instruction to meet the individual student learning needs. Evaluation of candidate performance will be a collaborative effort by the university instructor and the field teacher using established assessment instruments. Candidates will be required to acquire state-required FBI and BCII Background checks before teaching in grades 4 through 9 and 7 through 12 classrooms. Financial outlay required to pay for background checks. Prerequisite: Approval of Content.

EDU 3371. Middle Child and Adolescent Social Studies Methods/Field Experience (I, II; 3) This course will provide teacher candidate of Middle Child and Adolescent youth with various teaching and assessment strategies and models which provide social studies concepts and skill learning necessary for students to both understand and apply social studies concepts and skills in various contexts.  The course will include a field dimension of at least 80 hours in which candidates will be assigned to work with a field teacher in an appropriate setting.  During this time, candidates will gain greater command of their abilities to plan, implement and evaluate students in social studies, manage the classroom and differentiate their instruction to meet the individual student learning needs. Evaluation of candidate performance will be a collaborative effort by the university instructor and the field teacher using established assessment instruments. Candidates will be required to acquire state-required FBI and BCII Background checks before teaching in grades 4 through 9 and 7 through 12 classrooms. Financial outlay required to pay for background checks. Prerequisite: Approval of Content.

EDU 3372. Middle Child and Adolescent Science Methods/Field Experience (I, II; 3).This course will provide teacher candidates of Middle child and Adolescent youth with various teaching and assessment strategies and models, which provide science concepts and skill learning necessary for students to both understand and apply science concepts and skills in various contexts. The course will include a field dimension of at least 80 hours in which candidates will be assigned to work with a field teacher in an appropriate setting.  During this time, candidates and differentiate their instruction to meet individual student learning needs. Evaluation of candidate performance will be collaborative effort between the university instructor and the field teacher using established assessment instruments. Candidates will be required to acquire state-required FBI and BCII Background checks before teaching in grades 4 through 9 and 7 through 12 classrooms.  Financial outlay to pay for the background checks. Prerequisites: Approval of Program Advisor.

EDU 3861. Language Arts Content Capstone (I, II; 4) This course is designed to improve content knowledge, skills and assessment strategies for better comprehension of Language Arts Content for middle and AYA programs as aligned with Special Program Area Standards, Ohio Teaching Standards and Ohio Language Arts Content Standards.  Students learn self-direction in mastering Language Arts content concepts, skills and pedagogy to prepare for teaching and PRAXIS II content and PLT examinations. Prerequisite: EDU 3361 and approval of Language Arts Program Coordinator.

EDU 3862. Mathematics Content Capstone (I, II; 4) This course is designed to improve content knowledge, skills and assessment strategies for better comprehension of Mathematics content for middle and AYA programs, as aligned with Special Program Area Standards, Ohio Teaching Standards and Ohio Mathematics Content Standards.  Students learn self-direction in mastering Mathematics content concepts, skills and pedagogy to prepare for teaching and PRAXIS II content and PLT Examinations. Prerequisites: EDU 3362 and permission of the Mathematics Program Coordinator.

EDU 3871. Social Studies Content Capstone (I, II; 4) This is a course to improve content knowledge, skills and assessment and to improve skills and assessment strategies for better comprehension of Social Studies content for middle and AYA programs as aligned with Special Program Area Standards, Ohio Teaching Standards and Ohio Content Standards.  Students learn self-direction in mastering Social Studies content concepts, skills and pedagogy to prepare for teaching, PRAXIS II content and PLT Examinations.  Prerequisites: EDU 3371 and permission of the Social Studies Content Coordinator.

EDU 3872. Science Content Capstone (I, II; 4) This is a course to improve content knowledge, skills and assessment and to improve skills and assessment strategies for better comprehension of Science content for middle and AYA programs as aligned with Special Program Area Standards, Ohio Teaching Standards and Ohio Content Standards.  Student learn self-direction in mastering science content concepts, skills and pedagogy to prepare for teaching and PRAXIS II content and PLT examinations.  Prerequisites: EDU 3372 and permission of the Science Program Coordinator.

EDU 4442. Curriculum and Assessment for Intervention Specialists I (I, II; 3) The behavioral and educational study of children with specific learning disabilities and inferred neurological dysfunctions, and consideration of educational and psychological modalities of intervention. The focus is on curriculum for and assessment of individuals with learning disabilities. Prerequisites: EDU 2262, EDU 2264, EDU 2266.

EDU 4443. Behavior Management for Intervention Specialists (I, II; 3) This course guides the prospective special education teacher in analyzing and evaluating the many aspects of teaching individuals with specific emotional disturbance. Integrating specialized courses into unified systems, the course involves participation and observation in facilities that concern themselves with individualized instructional planning and assessment of the developmental characteristics of learners. The focus is on behavioral management techniques for individuals with learning disabilities. Pre-serve teachers will conduct an independent investigation of a problem selected in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisites: EDU 2262, EDU 2264, EDU 2266.

EDU 4444. Careers and Transition Planning for Intervention Specialists (I; 3) This course prepares teacher candidates for in-depth instructional planning and assessment of individuals with mild or moderate mental retardation. Emphasis is placed on the development of career and transition plans as related to specific learning and behavior characteristics of individuals with mental retardation. Prerequisites: EDU 2262,EDU  2264, EDU 2266.

EDU 4450. Communication Disorders for INS (II; 3) Communication Disorders focuses on the study of the effects of cultural and linguistic differences on growth and development, characteristics and cultural use of language, augmentative and assistive communication strategies, speech, language and vocabulary development. Various methods and strategies for enhancing the communication skills of individuals with exceptionalities will be addressed. Special emphasis is placed on the instructional skills, methods, and materials for diagnosis, remediation, and correction of reading difficulties. Prerequisites: EDU 2262, EDU 2264, EDU 2266.

EDU 4491. Student Teaching (I, II; 9) A semester of practical teaching experience at the relevant early childhood, middle and/or secondary levels in public or private schools.  The candidate is under the daily supervision of the field supervisor in a classroom appropriate for the teacher candidate’s preparation, and periodic supervision of the University Supervisor, who has experience and education in the area of the candidate’s preparation.  It is expected that the candidate will successfully exhibit the appropriate skills in lesson planning, lesson presentation, assessment, expected of a novice teacher.  Co-requisite: EDU 4895.  Candidate must register for this course one semester before the course begins, i.e., register in spring for fall class; register for fall in spring class.  Prerequisites: All courses in the candidate’s program, professional education and general education, must be completed before registering for student teaching, GPA 2.5 or above, clear FBI and BCII background check, approval from Director of Field and Clinical Experience Program Coordinator and Department Chair.  Students are responsible for the cost of the BCI and FBI background checks.

EDU 4895. Capstone Seminar (I, II; 3) This culminating professional education course focuses on the requisite professional knowledge, skills and dispositions required of teacher candidates completing the Central State University, College of Education Teacher Preparation Programs.  The seminar focuses on the cumulative pre-professional development of relevant knowledge bases, performance skills and dispositions as aligned with the College of Education’s Conceptual Framework, the Special Program Areas, and the Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession, the PRAXIS II PLT and PRAXIS II Content Examinations.  Candidates take this seminar congruently with EDU 4491, Student Teaching on one evening per week.  Content covered includes debriefing and problem-solving of experiences encountered during student teaching, practice on sections of the PRAXIS PLT and Content Tests, Culminating work on the Program Portfolio transitioning to a Professional Portfolio, Completion of the Teacher Performance Assessment.  Prerequisites: All courses in the candidate’s program, professional education and general education must  be completed before registering for this course, cum GPA 2.5 or above, approval of Director of Field and Clinical Experience, Program Coordinator and Department Chair; requisite: EDU 4491.  Candidate must register for this seminar one semester before the course begins, i.e. Register in spring for fall class; Register in fall for spring class.